Steel

12L14

See 1215 steel below.

 

1215

1215 steel is the lead-free replacement for 12L14 leaded steel, with virtually identical properties. This low-carbon, case-hardening steel is an ideal material for many round and hex-shaped parts. 1215 steel offers good strength combined with inherent ductility, toughness, and fine surface finishes. Its free-machining qualities yield smooth machined surfaces and tight tolerances, especially suited for threaded parts. This steel has superior case hardening qualities. We carburize-harden most of our finished 1215 steel parts to provide a hard, wear-resistant surface while retaining a tough, ductile core. According to the AISI/SAE numbering system, the “12” in 1215 signifies the steel’s type (free-machining steel with added Sulphur and Phosphorus) while the “15” represents the carbon content in 100ths of a percent (.15%).

 

1018

As our material of choice for rectangular parts, this low-carbon, case-hardening steel offers good strength combined with inherent ductility, toughness, good surface finishes, and weldability. 1018 steel has excellent case hardening qualities. We carburize-harden most of our finished 1018 parts to provide a hard, wear-resistant surface while retaining a tough, ductile core. According to the AISI/SAE numbering system, the “10” in 1018 signifies the steel’s type (plain carbon) while the “18” represents the carbon content in 100ths of a percent (.18%).

 

1144

 This high-carbon, through-hardening steel is used when high tensile and yield strength are required. We use a cold-finished “Stressproof” grade of this steel, which offers excellent strength, good ductility, and very low distortion after machining due to a combination of its chemistry, method of manufacture, and stress-relief heat treatment. According to the AISI/SAE numbering system, the “11” in 1144 signifies the steel’s type (free-machining steel with added Sulphur) while the “44” represents the carbon content in 100ths of a percent (.44%).

 

4130

This is an “Alloy Steel”, commonly referred to as “Chromoly” due to the addition of Chromium and Molybdenum as alloying elements. This high-carbon, through-hardening steel provides excellent tensile and yield strength, and is highly resistant to cracking due to its superior ductility and toughness. Carr Lane Mfg. uses this material in applications where large amounts of stress are applied to the material, especially when deformation is preferable to cracking. In nearly every application, this material is through-hardened. According to the AISI/SAE numbering system, the “41” in 4130 signifies the steel’s type (Chromium-Molybdenum Alloy) while the “30” represents the carbon content in 100ths of a percent (.30%).

 

A-2

A-2 is categorized as a “Tool Steel” – an alloy steel with a very high carbon content (1.0%). Chromium and molybdenum are the primary alloying elements. The letter “A” signifies that this is an air-hardening tool steel (versus an oil-hardening type that requires oil quenching). This material is used in applications where hardness, wear resistance, and toughness are of primary importance. In nearly every application this material is through hardened.

 

A36

ASTM grade A36 steel is a hot-rolled, low-carbon steel. This medium-strength steel offers excellent ductility, toughness, and weldability. It is generally used without heat treatment for thick plates or steel shapes such as I-Beams, angles, and channels.

 

Invar 36

First invented in 1896 by a Swiss Physicist, this nickel-iron alloy has an extremely low Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE) – so low that the inventor won the Noble prize for this invention in 1920. Containing 36% Nickel, is it softer than steel and very difficult to machine, but is very useful in applications where the product will undergo multiple heat-cool cycles and dimensional consistency is required. This material is not hardenable, but is annealed for stress relief after machining. It is capable of being coated by hard materials, such as PVD. Please contact us more details.